Field Trip

Photo of KSU students and I during their tour. Of note, you can see the hole in the studio wall for the drywall to be offloaded into the house. It was sealed up later that day.

We had some very special guests stop out at the job site today.  We (I) welcomed Joe Ferut’s architecture class from Kent State University.  Joe is our architect and a professor at the school.  We had nine of his fourth year students visit.  It was fairly cold out there today but fortunately the season’s first snow fall gave way to partly sunny skies by ten o’clock. 

The insulation crew was hard at work when I showed up.  The second floor had been insulated the previous day and today the first floor was being wrapped up.  We’re using a spray cellulose insulation made from recycled newspapers.  This process creates a lot of dust and left over insulation bits, but everything is swept up back into the hopper and sprayed back onto the walls.  A large truck pumps the material to and from the house.  Inside technicians spray the insulation between each of our 2×6 framed bays.  They then take a board and drag it along the studs, removing the excess insulation which is collected and returned to the truck.

We talked to the students about the architect – client process, our project and some of the exterior features.  We then walked inside and toured the house.  Much was mentioned regarding the energy-efficient tactics we employed as well as some of the products we used such as the Serious windows and the Quadrafire pellet fireplace.  The students seemed to like climbing up into the loft and admiring the view and space.  apparently I now know, the loft can hold eleven people at least.  Party!

I had to leave soon thereafter but I had an enjoyable time showing off the project.  We’re really proud of what we’re accomplishing, and more importantly energized knowing that we’re sharing info that will be beneficial to the next generation of architects.

Good pic illustrating all the insulation strategies including caulk, spray foam and blown in cellulose.

Happy corduroy day by the way (11-11-11).

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