Hall Lamp LED Bulbs

We have two small lamps upstairs on the Mexican hutch, and the CFL bulb in one of the lamps started to die out, so I was instructed to fix this. I went to Home Depot and picked up a pair of Philips 40W equivalent light bulbs.

Performance wise they use 5.5 watts (vs. 10 watts for the CFL’s they replace), 40 watt equivalent, 2700K (warm) color, 450 lumens. (Note the link on the HD website says 7 watts but the packaging on mine says they only use 5.5 watts.) They look nice with a clear injection molded “sparkle” diffuser that makes them twinkle a bit behind the lamp shade. Home Depot had some ceiling fan bulbs that were similar but with a frosted bulb. I wasn’t sure, so I just went with these clear guys. Likely the ceiling fan bulbs would have been fine too. Philips is my “go to” brand for LED’s generally speaking. Though it seems like Home Depot is dialing back their Philips offering; I hope this isn’t a sign of things to come.

At any rate, the decorative lamps in the hallway now have new energy efficient bulbs. I’ll recycle the used CFL’s at our county’s hazardous household waste collection site in the next week or two. Reminder, you need to recycle CFL’s properly because they contain mercury. Don’t break them!

 

 

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G24Q-3

Our nightmare is over! No, Donald Trump is still president. What I’m talking about is that I am finally  successful in changing the upstairs hall lightbulbs after three months.

The family unit was cleaning the upstairs hallway and it reminded me that I still needed to get bulbs for those ceiling fixtures. And as you’ve surely read, the LED bulbs didn’t work with the ballast. I couldn’t remove the ballast myself, so the LED bulbs went back the manufacturer. The replacement CFL’s I followed up with had the wrong base, G24Q-1, so they wouldn’t connect to my light fixture. Back those went.

Well today I ran out to my favorite light bulb retailer, Home Depot, and purchased G24Q-3 CFLs from my favorite lighting manufacturer Philips. They are 2,700K and use 26W (which is high) and are 1,800 lumens (also high).

The packaging opened easy enough, and is fully recyclable. I popped the new bulbs in and “voila!”

Light!

One thing off of my “to do” list.

 

Light Bulb Debacle

As you saw in this write up a couple weeks ago, I tried to switch out the CFL bulbs in the upstairs hallway with LED bulbs. Well turns out that they are not “plug and play” rather the ballast needs to be removed for the LED lights to work. I called MaxLite and the technician made it sound pretty easy to remove the ballast, so I gave it a try.

It was a friggin’ disaster.

So I’m sending the bulbs back to EnergyAvenue. And I’ll call MaxLite this week and see if they make a true plug and play lightbulb. Otherwise I may just have to revert back to CFL bulbs. Maybe down the road I’ll simply have an electrician change out the three hallway light fixtures and cut my loses.

It took me a half hour to figure out how to take the light and ballast apart. Then when I looked inside there was no way the ballast was ever meant to be unwired. I am not an electrician by any scope of the imagination so I said “F*ck this” and reassembled everything.

I don’t even know what a ballast does.

I’m taking the rest of Sunday off and watching a movie or playing video games.

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The inside of a CFL light fixture ballast.

Garage Door Opener Bulb

Okay, so this probably isn’t my most exciting written piece, but I’m kinda jazzed I got light bulbs for my garage door openers. We were placing an order on Amazon and I noticed they now offer these great Genie brand garage door opener LED bulbs. I had worked on a project designing several displays for these bulbs and my interest was piqued.

The reason you need a special bulb for your garage door opener is one, they need to be vibration resistant for obvious reasons. And secondly the garage door opener can cause interference with regular LED bulb electronics.

These gems were about $10 apiece and are a 10w bulb (60w equivalent). So they’re not the most efficient bulb but then again how often are the going to be on. They put out an amazing 800 lumens each. They are 3000K, so fairly warm for a garage, and will last 22+ years. The bulbs are also rated for cold weather (it’s 60 degrees in January today so maybe that’s not as much a concern anymore in Ohio), and damp locations, so no worries with their garage environment performance. I believe the bulbs are also smaller than a typical light bulb; I think they are considered A19.

 

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Update on my upstairs hall LED’s: one of the bulbs flickered and went out. I think I need to remove the CFL ballast and direct wire the bulbs. I call the store I bought them from and they referred me to MaxLite. I left a message at MaxLite but haven’t heard from them yet. I may just try and do it myself and use the bulbs I have as opposed to sending them back. I’ll keep you posted (yes, I know, it’s all so thrilling).

G24Q LED Bulbs

[Update: these bulbs didn’t work for my application without removing the ballast, and that was “no bueno” when I tried. Read about it here.]

The upstairs hallway lightbulbs have been burning out, so it was finally time to replace them. I took the opportunity to upgrade the bulbs from compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs to new modern LED bulbs.

The biggest challenge was the light fixture takes four pin G24Q style bulbs, which I’ve never even seen before. So I searched the internet and sure enough there were some options for LED G24Q bulbs. Even just a year or two ago it might have been difficult to find this form factor in LED technology, but now that LED’s are mainstream so to speak, I believe you can find them as a replacement for virtually any bulb you’ll find in your home.

I wanted an LED bulb that matches the warm 2700K glow of the CFL’s (the higher the number the colder or blue the light gets all the way up to 5000K). The LED bulb also needed to work with this CFL light fixture, which means it needs the built in electronics to run without having to modify the fixture’s ballast or wiring. I discovered just what I was looking for at Energy Avenue online.

There are three reasons why I chose LED replacement bulbs versus CFL bulbs. One is CFL’s contain Mercury, so if you break a bulb you have a major problem to clean up. Mercury is a huge health hazard if you inhale, touch or otherwise are exposed to it. Secondly LED’s use less energy. In this case at 8 watts, they use less than half the energy of a CFL. Lastly the LED bulbs will last 20 years compared to around 5 years for the CFL’s which means I don’t have to get up on a chair and change bulbs in this enclosed fixture very often, saving me about an hour of my life.

Switching the bulbs was easy and they provide an equal amount of light and color as the CFL’s did. The LED bulbs I selected are unidirectional which means they cast light down only, not all over like the CFL’s. This does create visual hot spots in the fixtures when they are on, which can be distracting, but in the grand scheme of things I don’t care too much, plus I don’t go upstairs that often. You can get LED’s that shine in all directions, I just didn’t think it would be an issue and I’m too lazy to send them back. The MaxLite bulbs I bought do have a cool swivel action so you can rotate the lens to where you want it. This is helpful because with the G24Q four pin base you can not always plan on which way the bulb will face.

By changing these four bulbs upstairs the number of non-LED bulbs we have falls even further down. Pretty soon we will be 100% LED light bulbs in the house which has always been a dream of mine. This really reduces our electric bill, saving us money and reducing how much our family is polluting the environment.

I’d love to hear if you’ve been trying LED bulbs in your home or office.

Have you discovered any interesting or uncommon LED bulb shapes or applications?

Share in the comments below.

-Chris

 

Solar Musings

Solar isn’t affordable? Won’t work in Ohio? Hmmm

Our electric usage has been 18,297 –> 16,455 –> 15,530kWh annually, I can only guess that LED’s are helping drive down our annual electricity usage.

Average home is 10,812kWh. Ours is higher because we run geothermal heating / cooling, water pump, sump pump. Also we work from home 24/7. Also a large home at 2.8K sq. ft+

For about $26K ($34-48K w/ battery back up), or less than the cost of a new, higher-end car, we can get a 12kW solar array and go completely off grid. If we can improve our electricity usage (we can) the system can be even smaller.

Our only utility bills would then be for gas (cooking, hybrid furnace) and phone/cable/internet.

And should the zombie apocalypse happen we’d be good to go.

 

Links:

 

Even More LED Bulbs

Was at my LED bulb spot, Home Depot, and saw three packs of my go to Philips BR30 light bulbs for about $18 per pack. It’s amazing how the cost of LED’s has plummeted. I picked up twelve bulbs to start replacing burnt bulbs, as well as some of the working incandescent bulbs, in the front hallway. This leaves about four ceiling bulbs on the first floor that aren’t LED. Once I change those out, I think there are eight on the first level, and about four bulbs on the second level that are incandescent.

Changing out these twelve bulbs this week lowers our energy use to operate the bulbs from 2,925w to 108w. For my $80 investment in twelve new bulbs we’ll save $1,848 over the next 22 years.

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br30-led-box-philips

This is my go to bulb for 6″ ceiling can fixtures. It’s dimmable, and performs great. Nice warm color, and enough lumens (650) to brighten any location.

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