Random House Repair

Sunday found me tackling a three items on my “honey do” list. Here is how things went or are going:

Repair The Coat Hook Rack In The Foyer

As you may remember, my sister-in-law ripped the coat rack off the wall in a drunken fit of rage on Thanksgiving (okay not really but that sounds better than “my wife and kids overloaded the coat rack, and my sister-in-law’s coat was the last straw”). Well anyway, the coat rack ripped clean out of the wall. My fix is to install a 1×8 poplar board, between the trim of the studio and front doors. I’m actually a huge fan of horizontal trim boards on walls. I think they add a “farm-y” or “craftsman” look to the interior and they are extremely practical, especially for coat racks, shelves or garment pegs. They also add some visual interest as well as make the wall color pop, if the trim is of a contrasting color such as white. If I was a designer, I would put them all over the place.

As of today, I’ve got the poplar trim board installed and painted. I’m trying to decide how best to install the coat rack. I’m leery to just screw it to the board, as I don’t want the screws to rip out of the poplar board. No worries about the board coming off the wall, it’s fastened with eight (8) SPAX screws so the board is going nowhere; just that the coat rack may still pull off under load if I don’t attach it properly.

Here’s the progress so far:

The coat rack ripped right out of the wall under load.

The coat rack ripped right out of the wall under load.

I cut away the damaged drywall.

I cut away the damaged drywall.

I spackled / mudded over the holes to repair them.

I spackled / mudded over the holes to repair them.

I pinned the 1x8 poplar board in place using my nail gun and small trim nails.

I pinned the 1×8 poplar board in place using my nail gun and small trim nails.

I used awesome 2-1/2" SPAX wood screws to attach the board to the studs, countersinking the heads.

I used awesome 2-1/2″ SPAX wood screws to attach the board to the studs, countersinking the heads.

I used spackle to cover up the nail holes. I then painted the trim generic white.

I used spackle to cover up the nail holes. I then painted the trim generic white.

Therma-Tru Door Corner Pads

For 18 months now I’ve needed to install the little “L” shaped pads in the lower corners of our Therma-Tru doors. We could see daylight in the corners which means we were leaking warm air outside all winter. I simply followed the directions that were included with the pads. It was super easy.

  1. adjust the threshold plate so the seal under the door fits snuggly
  2. caulk the seam where the plate meets the door frame
  3. install the wedge-shaped pads in the lower corners, tucking the “L” part behind the vertical seal on the door frame. I put the “L” part up. I think that was right.
You can see daylight before the pads were installed.

You can see daylight before the pads were installed.

Here are the parts and directions from Therma-Tru for the corner pads. They sent these to me for free after I sobbed that I didn't have any and could see daylight in the corners of my exterior doors.

Here are the parts and directions from Therma-Tru for the corner pads. They sent these to me for free after I sobbed that I didn’t have any and could see daylight in the corners of my exterior doors.

I caulked the plate after adjusting it vertically to fit snugly against the door's lower seal.

I caulked the plate after adjusting it vertically to fit snugly against the door’s lower seal.

The pad installed. Now we can't see daylight. Not sure if the house is any warmer.

The pad installed. Now we can’t see daylight. Not sure if the house is any warmer.

Laundry Room Drywall Repair

When we moved the water hook ups for the washer and dryer the plumber left a huge hole in the wall of our Laundry Room.  With two new cats exploring, the last thing I need is a cat, or kid, winding up behind the drywall meowing (yes my kids meow too, on occasion).

While the Cleveland Browns were blowing yet another football game I was in my studio cutting drywall. I attempted to cut it out of one piece and install it as such, which I was fairly successful at doing. The problem I ran into was for whatever reason the planes of the new drywall and old drywall already on the wall, didn’t really match up. Well let’s just say I didn’t let that dissuade me from making a mockery of the art of drywalling.  I proceeded to slather mud on the wall and squish tape into the joints. I pretty much hate drywalling.

Most “handy” people would look at something a homeowner does and give them pointers….”do this” or “try that“.  They would encourage and empower that person to do it themselves. They’d even make you feel bad if you called an electrician or plumber. ‘Cause after all, we’re all innately born with the ability to do simple house repair.

If a handyman saw how I do drywall they would say “You really should have hired someone to do that for you.

To say the drywall repair behind the washer and dryer is bad, is a gross understatement. It’s so bad, I CAN’T EVEN THINK OF A SNARKY ANALOGY! Just be glad I don’t make airplanes, condoms or lentil soup.

I put the second coat of mud on today. I’m thinking 32 more coats and everything should be evened out. The tape over some of the joints wasn’t sticking so I pulled it off and just slathered mud over those joints. It’ll be fine (no it won’t).  In the end, aren’t we just gonna tile over it all anyway?

The hole in the wall; a result of moving the water connection up in the Laundry Room.

The hole in the wall; a result of moving the water connection up in the Laundry Room.

On the right I screwed a piece of particle board in place so I'd have something to screw the drywall to.

On the right I screwed a piece of particle board in place so I’d have something to screw the drywall to.

This is where is started to go wrong. Once in place none of the drywall was on the same plane. Instead of fixing I figured mud could cover everything up. Frankly I'm not sure how I woulda fixed it anyway. What the hell, just "do it" baby!

This is where is started to go wrong. Once in place none of the drywall was on the same plane. Instead of fixing I figured mud could cover everything up. Frankly I’m not sure how I woulda fixed it anyway. What the hell, just “do it” baby!

After the first coat of mud.  Eeek!

After the first coat of mud. Eeek!

After the second coat of mud.  Looks better, kind of like having beer goggles on, and drinking your second beer.

After the second coat of mud. Looks better, kind of like having beer goggles on, and drinking your second beer.

I leave you with a picture of our new cats. Both of whom are driving me insane. They have to be sequestered in my studio indefinitely and cabin fever is forcing them to go insane to. I may have kitten fur mittens by Christmas.

cats-in-studio

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Power Outage

It’s been kind of crazy 48 hours or so. Not like end of the world crazy but the twisty part of the roller coaster crazy.  Sunday I spent the morning getting shelf supports for the adjustable shelves in my studio, and installing them. I was very excited to get the shelves all set so I could start loading them up with books and other items that have been in boxes for some time. I went with 1/4″ spoon-shaped supports. All the variations of 5mm I had bought were too loose in the adjustable holes.

The two types of shelf supports I bought at Home Depot. I ended up using the 1/4" spoon shaped supports

The two types of shelf supports I bought at Home Depot. I ended up using the 1/4″ spoon shaped supports

Once that was complete I went back to painting shelves and cabinets for / in the kitchen. The coffee cabinet doesn’t look good in black so I had a good alternative idea. Build two doors for to cover the entire set of cabinets, and finish them in the same walnut laminate. Then it will look like we just pushed that cabinet back, punctuating the existing orange cabinet “core” imagery.  It’ll be nice, I’ll show you when it’s done.

The afternoon found the wife, boys and I back on the road attempting to make a final call on the new plates. We packed up all our new Pottery Barn plates and drove up to the east side. We ended up stopping at Pier 1, William Sonoma and back to Pottery Barn. We compared our Gabriella pattern that we had already bought to the only other PB pattern we liked, Cambria. Well despite our uncertainty at home, the original set we bought felt the most “right”, despite the really deep dishes. The Cambria was even wider, and though it was shallower, we didn’t like it as much.

Our new dish on the left, the, shallower and wider, runner up on right at Pottery Barn.

Our new dish on the left, the, shallower and wider, runner-up on right at Pottery Barn.

Wife: “See, here in the store the [Gabriella] plate doesn’t seem too deep. I like it better than the other one and I think we’ll get used to it. We should just stick with that. What do you think?”

Me: “I agree. And it’s different from what we’ve had in the past. We’ll just have to adjust our lifestyle. Start waxing [body parts] and eating mussels over vermicelli more often.”

So with that the plate decision is over. We picked up a salt & pepper set as well as a creamer and sugar vessel to match. All ready for holiday dinner parties, and Sunday night Mr. Chicken take out.

Back home I made decent progress moving into my “new” studio.  I unpacked a few books and found spots for magazines, painting supplies and “stuff to be sorted later”. As a line of storms passed outside I curled up on the couch to watch TV. Since getting hooked last week, I’m two episodes into “The Good Wife” on CBS; discovered when the television was left on for five minutes too long after “The Amazing Race”. This along with my wild desire to trade my car in for a minivan have me worried about my ability to make sound decisions. Mid-life crises are not to be taken lightly and manifest themselves in all sorts of ways. Mine is going on year four I think, with no end in sight.

I retired dead tired at eleven. Only to be awoken by various things beeping and flashing on and off. I lay in bed, sleepy-eyed, not sure I understood what was happening. Then I figured it out.

The power was out.

And there was a weird alarm or buzz going sounding from somewhere.

“What the hell is that sound?”

Well turns out it was coming from the sump pump. More specifically the battery back up for the sump pump. The little “low battery power” light was on. Luckily the instructions were still under the unit, where they sat since installation almost two years ago. So by LED flashlight I read and re-read the instructions. As best I can tell the batteries were shot and with no AC power the buzzer went off.

The wife and I weighed our options. If the sump pump wasn’t able to work then it was only a matter of time until the basement started flooding. And with that ruining a few decades of crap that we have stored in our basement. “Hmmmm.”  After some time I finally woke up a little more and figured, well my only choice is to get the pump running again and doing its job. Moving all that crap was not an option. And there was no way to tell when the power would come back on. By the way I have given some serious thought to getting a whole house backup generator so I don’t have to deal with this crap. Invariably these emergencies always happen on Sunday night. Oh, and another thing, it’s my fault I didn’t check the battery, but 1) why doesn’t the thing chirp or something to tell me the batteries are low before the power goes out, and 2) why does the alarm have to sound the entire time the power is out?  Once again, decent product poorly designed because human factors are not taken into consideration. Frankly someday I’d like to have a master “dashboard” for the house so I can check ALL the systems at a glance and not have to remember if I checked this or that. Systems need to be designed, built and distributed for lazy guys like me. Fortunately for me (yes, patting the wife and I on the back) we were willing to take a stab at fixing the problem; after all it was Sunday night and there isn’t anyone to call when your sump pump goes down as far as I know.

Ok, I’m going to Walmart” I announced. The instructions and the current batteries gave me enough info to figure I could basically buy two marine batteries and replace the old ones with them.  The wife held down the fort as I departed the driveway at 12:07am, destination our 24-hr Walmart. Note, the lights were on everywhere but our handful of houses on Riverview.  Fate, god and all their friends hate me, I’m certain of it.

I’m always leery of what I’ll see at Walmart after midnight on a Sunday night [actually Monday morning]. It was dead save but a few people doing their weekly shopping at this time…so weird. I tried not to make eye contact. I didn’t have much luck until I saw the last section of batteries: “Ahhh…marine batteries“. I grabbed two 12V batteries whose markings seemed to approximate what I had left behind at home. Most importantly they had smaller threaded terminals which were critical for jumping the batteries together and connecting them to the power supply. I loaded my cart, paid for them and headed back home.

Buying marine batteries at 12:30am at Walmart. I passed on buying the santa sweater.

Buying marine batteries at 12:30am at Walmart. I passed on buying the santa sweater.

The Rabbit at Walmart at 12:30am on a Monday morning. There aren't many people shopping at WM this late on a "Sunday night" but I'm fairly suspicious of all of them.

The Rabbit at Walmart at 12:30am on a Monday morning. There aren’t many people shopping at WM this late on a “Sunday night” but I’m fairly suspicious of all of them.

Back home I grabbed a handful of wrenches and headed downstairs with the wife in tow. The instructions said to have a helper in case the batteries blow up and spray hydrochloric acid all over my face, hands and body. She was my assigned helper. Plus I guess the battery charging process produces toxic gas which can cause you to pass out and die. Once again, good to have a helper. I’m glad this set up is in my basement within cat licking distance.

I gingerly unhooked wires by flashlight, trying not to touch anything but the fasteners with my wrench. I even put on a small rubber glove, not really knowing if that would keep me from getting electrocuted to death. Thank god, disconnecting the wires made the high-pitched buzzing alarm stop. I removed the fuse and unplugged everything as well, not necessarily in that order by the way; refer to your instructions if you’re trying this at home. I then removed the old batteries, and delicately wiped up some “goo” in the bottom of the battery container.

Reversing the order of operation I put the two new batteries in the container, jumped them together then hooked up the positive and negative leads to the power supply.

“Crap!”

The freaking alarm started sounding again. Low battery light is on again. It’s 1:30am on a school night.

“What the f*ck?! These are new batteries.”

We looked at each other. I didn’t understand, does this mean the old batteries were fine? The new batteries weren’t fully charged? The low battery alarm goes off when battery power is below ~23V total.  I wanted to cry, scream and burn the house down all in the course of 30 seconds of thought. I went through everything in my mind. Then I had a thought but very little confidence in it.

I reinserted the fuse into the power supply.  Voila! The alarm stopped.

The old batteries. Positive and negative terminals, and one white jumper wire going from + to - in the foreground.

The old batteries. Positive and negative terminals, and one white jumper wire going from + to – in the foreground.

Here's the power supply for the sump pump, ready to be reconnected.

Here’s the power supply for the sump pump, ready to be reconnected.

By time I got back to bed I think it was 2am.  The power came back on at 2:30am.  Of course.  Oh well now we have new sump pump batteries. I should start checking them in the future. Oh the joys of home ownership when you’re a lazy homeowner like me.

Alright I’m going to bed. Business picked up a little this week so I’ll be busy again.

But for now I’m tired.  Stay tuned for more fun later this week.

Studio Day 7-ish….Painting The Walls

After three days of working the wife’s weekend art show, Monday and Tuesday found me with no active projects to work on. Despite being destitute and borderline broke, I made the executive decision to take the opportunity to get my studio whipped back into shape this week. I rationalize it this way, once my studio is presentable to the world, I can use it for hosting work meetings and clients.   If that’s not rationale enough for you, I did sell a painting on Monday so that helps pay the bills during my few days “off” this week.

Yesterday I “cut-in” the edges of the walls in my office space, using Sherwin Williams SW 6121 Whole Wheat.  In the afternoon we ran out to the Sherwin Williams store to take advantage of a 40% off sale they were having; picking up some green paint for one of the kids’ bedrooms, and I bought some masking tape since I was without any by mid day. I’m not sure what else I accomplished yesterday….it doesn’t seem like much but I guess that was it. I did write-up some meeting notes, so not all was painting, I did do some work….oh and I delivered that painting, and even treated the family to Zoup for dinner (yummy lobster bisque).

Cutting in the corners, then roll on the paint.

Cutting in the corners, then roll on the paint.

I woke up and got to painting by 7am this morning. My goal was to get the entire office and studio painted so I could begin the shelves on Wednesday.  And I accomplished my goal.  My studio is the largest room in the house, and with all the bookcases / shelves there are a lot of corners to tape off. I used about one and a half gallons of Emerald satin paint to cover all the walls.  Oh, by the way, I checked with the helpful folks at my local Sherwin Williams store and the Emerald paint is in fact zero-VOC paint so we’re good on that front.

The shelves are primed and the trim is taped, ready for the wall color to be applied.

The shelves are primed and the trim is taped, ready for the wall color to be applied.

 

Sherwin Williams SW 6121 Whole Wheat in the can, ready for our walls.

Sherwin Williams SW 6121 Whole Wheat in the can, ready for our walls.

 

Coffee break while painting. The sun came out in between snow flakes.

Coffee break while painting. The sun came out in between snow flakes.

 

The shelves are strong enough to hold my weight.

The shelves are strong enough to hold my weight.

We really like the color. It visually warmed up the space quite a bit and it’s not too dark. I know most artist studios are white but I’ve never been one to follow the “rules“. I want my studio to be homey and comfortable. I also love that it is off our palette that we’re using for the interior of the house. It looks very similar to the hallway and kitchen colors but is different enough to add a whole new dimension to the interior space of the house. When looking through the open office pocket door the studio now beckons with a degree of mystery or discovery that was not present when the walls were just plain white. And as I look from my office to the front hall, all the colors layer upon each other and remind me of being out in the “real world” so to speak, with various textures, hues and visual geometry. There isn’t anything designer-ly about the composition, rather I find it to work because it evokes such natural feelings. The sense of being home because we are human beings and home to us is the earth. It’s in our soul. The color scheme, and dimension of details such as the deep windows, brings that marriage of man and earth.  I guess you have to live with it to understand.  However you describe it, it works most definitely. I don’t think I would ever change any of the colors we’ve painted the walls; at least not in the main living spaces. The more I live with the palette the more it becomes woven into me. And it is only reinforced when I go outside to see the natural world around the house.

The wheat color looks great and really warmed up the studio visually.

The wheat color looks great and really warmed up the studio visually.

I have a lot of great ideas for my studio space and will share those…lighting, furniture, decor… in subsequent installments.  For now the walls are done. Bookcases get painted tomorrow. I enlisted the wife to use a razor blade to get the paint off the cabinet trim where is seeped through, due to my crappy taping job.  She has the patience for that kind of work, I most certainly do not.

What colors inspire you? What do you think of how the studio is shaping up? What room do you want to makeover in your house?  Let’s get more interactive here….share your thoughts and comments. 🙂

-Chris

Studio Shelf Day 4….or is it 5?…

….oh hell, I don’t know what day we’re on in the studio. All I know is were making progress.  Okay I don’t know where we left off….Oh by the way I’m working on yet another blog (this time it’s for work so no swear words). As such I’m going to shoot to write for both blogs on Tuesday’s and Thursdays. If something cool happens, it’ll have to wait although I reserve the right to post up here, more than just Tuesday and Thursday, if the mood strikes or the bees do something cool. My hope is that this consolidates my writing time, makes things more consistent and better quality, blah, blah, blah….

Alright back to the studio. Well when we left off I was going to pay the painter guy to paint the shelves and studio walls. Well turns out we’re broke, at least for the next few weeks, and with Christmas approaching, I needed to take matters into my own hands. I cancelled the painter and went out to Sherwin Williams and bought about $180 worth of supplies to paint my studio. I chose Whole Wheat SW6121 from our Global Spice color palate, for the walls. The shelves will be painted Carboard SW6124 giving us the “tone on tone” look we adore so much. In fact both colors are off the same color card, three spaces apart. A happy coincidence since I was picking from the Global Spice chart which doesn’t indicate which colors are actually tones of each other. By the way, picking colors from the same card is awesome, especially in rooms that get some day light. During the day everything will look the same color from certain angles. Then at night the room takes on a ton of dimension with darker and lighter tones visually playing with each other. We did this trick in our old house with four!!! colors from one card in the kitchen, dinette, family room and fireplace. It was subtle but I found it delightful every time I laid on the couch with a beer and watched Cops.

Note, all the paint I’m using is Sherwin Williams’ top of the line Emerald paint, which up until a minute ago I thought was low or zero VOC paint…I’m not convinced it is. Oh well, we’ll survive.  SW does have Harmony zero VOC paint. Who knows what in the hell I am doing over here. Maybe I’ll go cut some more trees down and step on baby squirrels…

Well since I’m doing the studio myself, I started out caulking most of the joints on all the cabinets. I used a simple white paintable DAP Alex brand painter’s caulk from Lowes.

I hate caulking.

Plus I totally suck at it.

It requires patience and I have zero patience. I’m pretty much a ‘cut to the chase‘ kind of guy. Caulking is anything but ‘cut to the chase’. With caulk there is no chase. Just more joints to be caulked. Caulking makes cutting blue foam seem romantic and adventurous.

So of course I plastered caulk all over the place and gummed up my hands and ruined a bunch of rags. I guess you’re supposed to wet your fingers before you squish the caulk into the corners, and you should use a wet rag to clean up the excess.  Ugh, I would rather crawl under my deck, or listen to Taylor Swift go through her “pro vs. con” list of ex-boyfriends than clean up my caulk mess with a wet rag. They need to make sand able caulk for guys like me.

A day after the caulk was dry I primed all the cabinets with a zero-VOC primer from Sherwin Williams. I used exactly one gallon. It took me about a day. I used a brush and a roller. Now everything looks white.

I was humming along and now suddenly I got two new projects that are both due in 2 days (my life) so now I put the brakes on finishing the studio. Probably won’t get back to it until next week at the earliest. I think the gods are messing with me, exchanging one form of satisfaction for another. Oh well, doing the studio myself save me a grand and there’s no guarantee I’d have steady work this week or next. It will get done soon enough.  Here are tonight’s pics.  Check out Christine’s awesome Jeep cake she made for our guy’s birthday.

Studio Shelf Day #3

Today was a planned day off of work so we could get the last bookcase installed in my studio and install the finish trim. It took us about four and a half hours to get everything done today. I have some trim left to do in my office space but otherwise we are ready for painting.

Because everything is going to be painted we were able to use a lot of scrap trim to finish up the job; holes and edges can be sanded, caulked and painted and look just fine.

I really like the new angled bookcase we installed. It’s in my top five favorite things I’ve designed in my lifetime. It’s going to look great when it’s painted. The middle shelves are angled to get more storage capacity for larger books on the left side. At the right side it’s all the same depth so it doesn’t protrude into the floor space below.  There is still room in my studio nook now to put a chair and ottoman for reading or relaxing (sleeping).

We also trimmed out the tall bookcases with a wrap of 1×3’s at the ceiling and a band about 90″ up.  This lower band is right at the height necessary for a library ladder, should we ever choose to install one down the road.  Note to separate the wall color between his and her studio (above) we nailed up a small block of trim next to the window at the top of the tall bookcases (see photo).

I’m not sure what colors I’ll select for my studio, other than I think the bookcases will be “cardboard” in color, with the wall likely being a tone lighter than that. The painter recommended oil paint for the bookshelves for durability but we don’t think we want to deal with the smell and the long term chance that the paint might yellow.  Instead we’ll tell him to paint the shelves in latex (which isn’t as durable and never really “dries”) and then I’ll hit the horizontal surfaces with a water based clear coat to make them more durable, almost like plastic.

Take a look at the photos and let me know what you think.

 

Chris

Below the new bookcase is an access panel for the water shut off

Below the new bookcase is an access panel for the water shut off

The tall bookcases are all trimmed out and ready for painting.

The tall bookcases are all trimmed out and ready for painting.

The angled design of the bookcase allows larger items to be stored to the left, smaller items to the right, while preserving usable floor space.

The angled design of the bookcase allows larger items to be stored to the left, smaller items to the right, while preserving usable floor space.

The angled bookcase installed and ready for painting.

The angled bookcase installed and ready for painting.

The three peanuts we grew this year.

The three peanuts we grew this year.

Studio Shelf Update

All is quiet on the home front. We pushed back the final day of studio shelf installation to next Monday but I did get a photo of the last studio shelf and it looks great.

The last studio shelf.

The last studio shelf.

Studio bookshelf design.

Studio bookshelf design.

I can’t wait to get the studio done and move back in.  In other news I finally bit the bullet and turned on the furnace. As I sit at my desk freezing to death I felt it was time. The thermostat said the house was at ~67-68 degrees but all I know is I’m freezing in my office so on goes the furnace set at a balmy 70 degrees.  I can hear the fireplace going in the family room, set to an even warmer 73 degrees (which it does accomplish in that space.

I know I have to install some sealing bits on the Thermatru exterior doors, but alas I forget where I put the padded envelop I got from Thermatru in my haste to clean out my studio.  I know you can see daylight at the bottom of a couple of the doors. Hopefully I can fix that.  Well back to work. I just wanted to show off the newest bookcase waiting to be installed.

-Chris

Studio Shelves Day 2

Yesterday my brother and I spent another day installing the studio shelves.  We got the bookcases installed on either side of the north studio window.  I’m ecstatic to have so much storage now in the studio. I can’t wait to get them trimmed out and painted and start using them; unpacking boxes of junk that have been sitting in our basements for years upon years.

It was nice to spend two days working alongside my brother too; a rare treat, even though I don’t do much except hold up walls with my shoulder and talk the whole time. Still I think two sets of hands are better than one, and we weren’t in any hurry.

Sunday we spent a little time showing the house off to some special guests, interested in learning more about the design and sustainable features of the house.  It’s always enjoyable to tour the house and share what works and what we would do differently. Nature provided us with a beautiful, sunny day to show off how the sun bathes the front room with light.  The kids were even able to go out and play in the yard on a nice fall day.

For whatever reason two days of working on shelves has worn me out completely (and I didn’t even do anything). Or maybe it’s just a long week, month or year(s) catching up to me. We took the afternoon off to see a movie and grab a bite to eat.  I love going to the movies. I suspect probably because of the escapism. The more complicated and stressful my life becomes the more I enjoy getting away from it all every now and then.  Installing the shelves was a similar like diversion. A way station away from walking on the edge of a razor.

Here (below) are the pics from yesterday’s shelf install. Also today I started making the sunflower seeds from that sunflower head I picked.  The seeds are soaking overnight in saltwater, then tomorrow I’ll roast them for ~40 mins in a 300 degree oven, with some oil and salt. Friday we will install the last studio shelving unit and trim it all out. Also note my brother installed the laundry room shelves in between our store-bought cabinets.